Introducing Divi

Landlords Property Access

There is some ambiguity regarding our rights to access tenanted properties. The law is clear in that we must allow you "quiet enjoyment" of your property. However, there may be times when we need to gain access and under the terms of your tenancy agreement, we are allowed to do this. The following page explains your rights and our rights with respect to accessing the property.

Tenancy Documents

Vivamus suscipit tortor eget felis porttitor volutpat. Pellentesque in ipsum id orci porta dapibus.

Damp and Mould Problems

Vivamus suscipit tortor eget felis porttitor volutpat. Pellentesque in ipsum id orci porta dapibus.

Heating Problems

Vivamus suscipit tortor eget felis porttitor volutpat. Pellentesque in ipsum id orci porta dapibus.

Landlords Property Access

Vivamus suscipit tortor eget felis porttitor volutpat. Pellentesque in ipsum id orci porta dapibus.

Giving Notice

Vivamus suscipit tortor eget felis porttitor volutpat. Pellentesque in ipsum id orci porta dapibus.

Reporting A Repair

Vivamus suscipit tortor eget felis porttitor volutpat. Pellentesque in ipsum id orci porta dapibus.

There is a process which you must follow if you wish to end your tenancy.  You must give us written notice that you wish to end the tenancy agreement and that notice must be a period of at least one month. You cannot simply walk away from your contractual obligations or post the keys through the letterbox to end the tenancy, this is called ‘abandonment’ and will not end your tenancy agreement. If you did this, your legal agreement with us will continue even though you’ve left and the we can continue to charge you rent.

Giving Notice To Quit The Tenancy

Ending a tenancy can only occur when one of the parties to the tenancy agreement gives notice to the other. If you want to vacate the property at the end of the tenancy agreement, or a date after the end of the agreement, you must provide at least 28 days notification in writing of your intention to vacate and specify the date that you will leave the property. Rent will be payable until the 28th day or until you remove all of your possessions and back the keys to the property. If you want to end your tenancy early during the fixed term of the tenancy, you may do so by giving the required notice, but you will be liable for the rent until the property is re-let, and you will also be liable for the marketing costs to re-advertise the property.

Under extreme circumstances, a tenancy agreement can be broken. However, there are penalties involved when breaking a tenancy agreement early and the named tenant/s are ultimately responsible for the tenancy until a new and approved tenant is found, along with paying the cost of re-advertising

.

Final Inspection

Rent will be charged until the day the keys are returned.  We will arrange with you to do a final inspection of the property where we will list the items which we feel need your attention and this will be put in writing to you.  The final inspection list will be created by visual inspection and in association with the independent inventory which was created at the outset of the tenancy.

Returning Keys

If you do not return all keys to us at the end of the tenancy, you are in effect still in tenancy and the law recognises this.  We are therefore legally allowed to charge you rent until all keys are returned to us.  

Deposit Claim

When a tenancy ends, tenants can request their deposit back from us. Where there is no reason to make a deduction, we must repay the deposit in full to the tenant. Where we wish to make a deduction, we must inform you of what the deduction is for and give you the opportunity either rectify the matter or dispute the deduction.

The deposit is there to give us financial security in case of rent arrears, a tenant damages the property or items go missing. There are many reasons why we may need to make deductions from a tenant’s deposit and we will use the Check-Out-Report to to comapare with the Check-In-Report as evidence for any deductions.

Below are the possible reasons for deductions;

  • Unpaid rent during or at the end of the tenancy.
  • Unpaid bills during or at the end of the tenancy.
  • Stolen or missing belongings.
  • Direct damage to the property and its contents.
  • Indirect damage due to negligence and lack of maintenance.
  • Lack of sufficient hygiene.
  • Lack of maintenance of key facilities – e.g. the garden, yards etc.
  • Unwanted belongings left after keys are returned.

If  you and we do not agree on any deduction being proposed then the deduction will have to be put into the “dispute” phase with the Tenancy Deposit Holder.

Here are the three ways that a deduction can be legitimised.

  • When the tenant agrees to the deduction(s)
  • When there has been a dispute resolution (by the Tenant Deposit Holder)
  • When there is a Court Order (by the County Court)

.

We promise we don’t send spam