Introducing Divi

Landlords Property Access

There is some ambiguity regarding our rights to access tenanted properties. The law is clear in that we must allow you "quiet enjoyment" of your property. However, there may be times when we need to gain access and under the terms of your tenancy agreement, we are allowed to do this. The following page explains your rights and our rights with respect to accessing the property.

Tenancy Documents

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Damp and Mould Problems

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Heating Problems

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Landlords Property Access

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Giving Notice

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Reporting A Repair

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Produce Less Moisture

Simple things make a huge difference, like keeping the lids on pans when cooking, drying clothes outdoors (and especially not on radiators), venting your tumble dryer to the outside and avoiding using paraffin heaters or flue-less bottled gas heaters which produce a lot of moisture.

 

Let the moist air out and the fresh air in;

Extractor fans are an effective way to get rid of moist air and steam so that less condensation forms. Some of our  homes have extractor fans which run continuously, fitted in the ceilings of bath and shower rooms. They use very little electricity. If your home doesn’t already have extractor fans then it’s well worth getting them fitted in the bathroom and kitchen. Fans that run on a timer, humidistat or pull-cord typically have a rating of 8-30W. A 30W appliance would need to run continuously for nearly a day and a half to use one unit (about 15p) of electricity.

Stop moist air getting into the rest of your home. When cooking or bathing, keep the kitchen or bathroom door shut and open the window so that the steam goes outside instead.

Meanwhile, let fresh air circulate to avoid mould forming where the air is still. Make sure there is a gap between your furniture and the walls, and give wardrobes and cupboards a good airing sometimes.

Heat your home a little more

While you don’t want to waste money heating rooms you don’t use, very cold rooms are much more likely to get damp and mould. Set the thermostatic radiator valve to 1 in unused rooms so the radiator gives out a little bit of heat whenever you have the heating on. If you don’t have central heating, consider using a room heater with a timer and temperature control. Remember, unused rooms will need a good airing from time to time..

Other Helpful Equipment

You can catch condensation dripping from windows with condensation channels and sponge strips (available from DIY shops). If you wipe down windows and sills in the morning this will also help, but be sure to wring out the cloth rather than dry it on a radiator. In extreme circumstances you may need to invest in a dehumidifier. These can help a lot but cost anything from £40 to over £200 and larger ones can be quite costly to run.

How to get rid of mould

If you already have mould on your walls and ceilings then you need to clean it off properly. An effective two-stage method is to start by cleaning off the mould with spray containing bleach. This will help remove the staining that persistent mould can leave behind. Leave to dry overnight and then spray the affected area with an anti-fungal wash and allow that to dry. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions and consider wearing a face mask when spraying.

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Condensation is not the only cause of damp

If you already have mould on your walls and ceilings then you need to clean it off properly. An effective two-stage method is to start by cleaning off the mould with spray containing bleach. This will help remove the staining that persistent mould can leave behind. Leave to dry overnight and then spray the affected area with an anti-fungal wash and allow that to dry. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions and consider wearing a face mask when spraying.

You could also treat the affected area with a mould-resistant paint, available from most major hardware stores.

 

Rising Damp

Only affects basements or ground floor rooms and normally rises no more than 30-60cms (12-24 inches).  Very rarely is black mould seen on rising damp but there are often white salts and ‘tide marks’ in affected areas.  It is caused by water rising from the ground through the brickwork or through a broken damp proof course.  The damp proof course is layer of waterproof material put in the bottom of walls to stop moisture rising.  If rising damp is present, it will be present all year round but will be worse in the winter. 

 

Penetrating Damp

Is only found on external walls or ceilings (for example if there is a roof leak). It appears because of a problem in the building such as missing or damaged brickwork, cracked rendering, pointing or missing roof tiles.  Black mould is very rarely seen on penetrating damp, it is more noticeable after rainfall with damp patches which may be wet to the touch.

 

Damaged Plumbing

can cause wet to the touch ceilings and walls, both inside and outside the house.  Black mould is rarely seen in this type of damp.  Checking pipework, bathroom and kitchen water and waste pipes and the seals around baths, showers and sinks will normally find the cause of the problem.

 

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